Tag Archives: setup

A Treefort Grows In Woodbury – Part 1

So this year, after much procrastination, we’ve decided to finally build a tree fort for the boys.

Now, I never had a tree fort growing up.  It was the kind of thing every kid dreamed up, but few ended up with.  We would climb around in trees all the time, and made forts consisting of branches and old blankets down on the ground.  But nothing as formal or engineered as one with planks, turrets, and a spyglass.

I began this project, in the same way I begin most of the unknown – I Googled it.

This turned up a number of sites, but most were plans to purchase, with few tips.  I flipped through a book at home called The Dangerous Book For Boys and found some helpful hints there to mount the boards onto the tree, and lay them at 90 degrees to form a subbase.   After that it was your typical construction.

So a jot later with a basic plan, and we headed out to the local Lowe’s hardware store.

After finding the bolts we needed, we grabbed a friendly salesman who seemed to have some semblance of knowing what he was doing, and got some advice.  2x8s for the frame base attached to the tree, and 2x6s for the flooring base on top of it, with planks on top of that.

I figured we’d build a base, and sort out the top (covered roof, railing, etc…) later on.

So we got home, unloaded and began to work.

Step 1- bolt the base to the trees.  If you look at our “plan” you see three circles representing each of the trees we’ll be using.  I put one in using a single 1/2×6 inch bolt, then attached the other side with a lot of up & down to make sure it was as level as I could get it.

I quickly found the leveling part was the tough one, as these boards were heavy, and lifting them solo 10 feet above the ground wasn’t easy.  After some quick thinking I placed some 4 inch screws just below where the boards will be attached.  This way I can lift them up slightly to drill it out and bolt it into place, while the other end is resting on the screw.

Then I go back to that end and attach it too.  Repeat this to wind up with 3 bolts at each point where the boards meet the trees.  Needless to say I now have the boards up, but still need to put 3 bolts through at each spot. The bolts themselves are very hard to get in, and I’m using just a hand ratchet, not an air gun like some folks have for their Indy car racing.

It will take some time, but we’re off to a good start. Next step is to finish off the bolts, then the 2×6 boards go on top roughly perpendicular.

In the end I’m hoping for a platform somewhere between 8×10 and 10×14.  Final dimensions depend on how far it will stick out away from the tree, and how easy I can put up support columns underneath the corners.  Fun, fun!!  :)

Share

Old School Shaving – A Lost Art

So now that we’re out of beard season, I’ve begun regular shaving once more.

I’ve never been a big fan –  always going for as many days as I can without looking too much of the caveman variety.  Besides which it was a pain.  Literally, when I went for more than 3 days, and the blades pulled more than sliced the hairs.

My Shaving GearI ran out of fresh blades so I went to the store to pick some up.  I know the prices have been heading north, but this time they’ve gone too far.  $22 for a 4 pack?!  I’ll be lucky if it lasts 2 months!  I had enough, and decided to go Old School.

I’ve been interested in straight edge and double edged razors in a nostalgic “how they used to do it” way, but it always seemed such as hassle to me on the surface.  After reading a few articles and watching some videos I finally decided to take the plunge (Mantic59 has some really good ones)

Going this route means an investment that can last years, and save you money in the end.  You’ll need a razor, a brush, some soap or cream, a bowl or mug, and probably a stand.

Most everyone likes the Merkur brand of razors, and other than a few variants the basic models come in a regular or long handled version.  You know what they say about big hands?  So I got the long handled model (180), along with 10 spare Merkur Double Edged (DE) blades.

The next big item is the brush.  Gotta go Badger on this one (check the link).  Authentic Badger hair brushes hold water very well, which helps hugely when you’re whipping up the froth.  FYI though they stink.  It smells like wet dog the first few times you use it, but it wears off eventually.  They range in type and prices from $13 on up to $150.  A really basic Boars hair brush can be picked up at your local pharmacy, but for just a few bucks more I got a very highly recommended Tweezerman “Best” Badger brush that ranks with ones 4X its price and has a lifetime warranty.   I’ve heard stories of guys getting high end Silvertip on eBay for less than $30 if you keep your eyes peeled.

I mentioned to my wife to be on the lookout for a thrift shop mug or bowl, and she surprized me with an equally inexpensive bowl she saw at the Christmas Tree Shoppe.  The lion faces on the side were what drew her in, but I appreciate the way the base can be held in one hand, and that the sides roll back in a bit keeping the lather contained.

A stand is pretty much optional, but if you’re looking to stick with this, I would recommend getting a decent one to keep the brush dry.  Metal ones work well, but I always like wood and found one on Amazon.  A little pricier than I would have liked, and doesn’t fit my razor too well, but a drill bit later to widen the handle channel and it works just fine.

Now the final choice – the soap or cream.  This is what really got me most excited once I got the process down.  The biggest difference between the canned stuff and this, is that these all have good moisturizers and make shaving faaaaaarrrrr better.  The choices are simply endless.  Sandalwood and Cinnamon or Musk with Tabac?  Citrus and Lime or Lavender?  Cream or soap?  Many of the soaps are purchased within a container or wooden bowl, but this is used for storage, while the mug or other bowl is used to prep the lather.  Initially I used some Colonel Conks Bay Rum soap, then some C.O. Bigelow shaving cream, and then some Van Der Hagen Select Shaving soap.  The Conks was my first batch, so while it worked out in the end, it was too runny and too watery due to my inexperience.  The C.O. Bigelow is loved by many people as the state side version of Poraso – a well respected Italian brand.   I thought as a cream it was easier to whip it up into a good lather.  The Bigelow has a decent scent with Eucalyptus, and tingles with Menthol.  As for the Van Der Hagen it is easily the cheapest at just $2 a puck, and whipped up just fine once I got the hang of it, but frankly it is bland compared to the others.  No tingle, no scent,no nothing – just gets the job done with a basic soap, and it looks like I would burn through it pretty quick too.

Now as for the shaving part, I seemed to do pretty well.  My problem was getting a decent lather up.  After 3 shaves and twice that in attempts to bring about a nice foam, the key I’m finding is to use just a bit of water, but not too much.  I start by soaking the brush in super hot water in the bowl for half a minute or so.  Then I dump the bowl, shake the water off the tip in a pumping action, and swirl the brush onto the soap puck until I get lather started (a minute or two).  Transfer this to the bowl and swirl away some more, and within a few minutes you’ll have a nice thick dense foam.  Add a little water if it seems difficult to whip away.

Keep going if you see bubbles, and you’ll go from this:

Loaded with Soap …To this: After a beating

Slap this on your face, while grinding it in circles.  This raises the hairs, preps and moisturizes the skin.  Let the razor glide on your face rather than pressing in, and work in sections.  Rinse with cool water to close up the pores and follow up with a decent aftershave or balm (no alcohol, read labels!)

Now it wasn’t an overnight transition.  I’ve read, and seen myself that it takes your face about 2 weeks to adjust.  You’re shaving the hairs now, not the skin on your face, but the razor is far sharper.  Expect a few scrapes, red streaks, and blood patches until you get the hang of it.  I would shave at night if I were you, otherwise your coworkers might wonder how the rest of the household survived the attacks.

After having toughed it out now though, I would have to admit it is indeed the best shave I was never looking for, nor expected.  But compared to the past, I now look forward to shaving, and seeing if I can improve my technique.

Go ahead – take the plunge!  Your manhood demands it!!  :)

Share

Ditching Cable – Part1

Broken Cable :(Or….  How I learned to love the Internet.

So after months and years of paying to the man for a decent picture, and 50,000 channels I never watch, I gave my $157 monthly bill a good hard look late last year.

I’ve found myself downloading more and more, and whenever I watched TV it was usually something I had taped with the DVR a few days earlier.  Whenever I watched through the channels, it was either for a show I would like to catch, usually after it had aired, or just random flipping.

So after much thought and a bit of research I decided to take the plunge as others had before me, drop cable television completely, and get everything online as much as possible.

Now, I could use my laptop, but I use this more for work than anything else.  I would also have to reconnect it every time I wanted to go online to view something.  My thought was to get a dedicated PC, and use this.

But I wanted to get a good PC.  Nothing too big like your average tower, or something that would suck my electricity bill dry, but also something that had enough horsepower to get the job done.

All this for under $500.Boxee on HTPC

After running past some reviews I settled on the Dell Zino, Acer Revo AR3610, or the Asrock HT330.  I was hoping to watch movies off DVD directly on the PC (so I could disconnect the DVD player as well), and that rules out the Acer as it doesn’t come with an optical drive (DVD).  I could always get an external one for USB, but that means more components, and more bucks.

So after much ado I order a Dell Zino on sale for around $450 shipped.  Of course, after I sent the order in, I receive a notice that it will ship nearly 3 weeks later.  That was just ridiculous to me.  I was a bit on the fence between the two remaining PCs, as Dell is more of a known brand, but the options were more limited with no optical audio port, a handful of USB ports, and only a single audio out.  Wheras the ASRock came with a DVD drive, 5.1 Dolby channel sound, optical sound out, plus options for HDMI, VGA, and 8 USB ports available (plus it included a remote).  Shortly thereafter I canceled the Dell order (with a 45 minute wait time on hold – ughhh), and ordered the ASRock.asrock_ion_330ht

It shipped out the next day, and arrived 4 days later.

The PC itself is about the size of a large hardcover, and uses just 65 watts while up and running.  It only comes with 2GB of RAM, but it is upgradable, and has decent sized HDD with 320GB of space.  The innards are tiny, and nearly all components come on board with an NVidia chipset and graphics, and a newer Intel Atom 330 dual-core processor.  Technically, this is not just a regular PC, but rather a NetTop.

So here I am, just over a month in, and while I’ve had some speed bumps, I would have to say it was a great choice.  So far, so good.

I am by nature a tinkerer.  I work in IT and I spend my days figuring things out.  The challenge it presents is not much for me, but rather just time.

Next post I’ll dive into the software options, streaming sites, and how to handle live TV.  Stay tuned!

Share

Blog on a roll

A few days later and I’ve got it where I want it.

I managed to find Google throws up lots of info, but tooling through it can be hard.

Going through the WordPress Codex is good, but I’m finding useful bits from other people that have been through it.

This helped me the most getting it switched from default domain/wordpress to domain: http://codex.wordpress.org/Giving_WordPress_Its_Own_Directory

Now that I’ve reset all the permissions, I’m on my way.  Now time to find some decent plug-ins and gadgets.

Share

Blog setup issues

So I’m a novice to the blog-o-sphere.  And I’m finding some quirky things with setting this up to where it works more easily.

I’ve found resetting permissions on the folders helps, but it’s not a clean cut as I’d like.

I’m sure I’ll get better in time, but I’m hoping I can sort this out before it gets too out of hand.  Keep up if you can :)

Share

1st Post – Welcome to the beer

Iron Horse Tripel MMmmm… so good.

I came across this one after cringing on the prices of 6 packs.  But when you’re looking at the larger 22oz on up, they run from $5.99 on up.  Doing the math this comes out to nearly $20 for a six pack.  So if you’re going to get a quality pack, anything less than $20 is a deal – and boy is this one worth it.

River Horse Tripel.  i’m a fan for sure.

Share